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To the NDP Establishment and its organizing committee PDF Print E-mail
Feb 20, 2018 at 05:15 PM
The NDP has bailed out on bringing a strong resolution supporting Palestinian human and civic rights to  the NDP convention floor. (https://ricochet.media/en/2130/palestine-resolution-narrowly-stopped-from-hitting-ndp-convention-floor). It got lost in a backroom somewhere. I cannot say that I am surprised. Nothing has changed since I was a candidate for the NDP in the 1988 federal election (Laprairie riding). The NDP Establishment was then, and for that matter always has been, decidedly pro-Israel to the entire evacuation of the Palestinian question. My longtime and late Palestinian friend, Rezeq Faraj ran for the NDP in the riding of St-Jean in 1988. (He took 20% of the vote). The only reason he was able to get the nomination was because then National Co-President of the NDP, Michel Agnaieff, backed Rezeq’s candidature to the hilt. He also supported me (the friend of the Palestinian) in my candidature. For the NDP Establishment (individuals like Lorne Nystrom),  Rezeq was “a problem for Ottawa.’

In short, the NDP Establishment is in no way different from that of the Liberal Party of Canada or the Conservative Party of Canada or of the U.S. Democratic or Republican parties when it comes to the question of Palestinian rights. Let me tell you this: Israel has put into effect over the years a rigid system of institutionalized segregation known as apartheid. I have studied it; I have been to the West Bank; I have seen it with my own eyes. There is no question of fence-sitting on the question of apartheid. One is against it or openly or tacitly in support of it. Whether or not the NDP is openly or tacitly in support of Israel’s apartheid system is a moot point. Qui tacit consentit.
 
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Jonathan Cook wins the 2011 Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism

At the 2011 Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism, awarded at a ceremony in London on 2 June 2011, Jonathan Cook was one of three winners. The other two were Umar Cheema, of the International News of Pakistan, and Charles Clover, of the Financial Times. Julian Assange, founder of Wikileaks, won the Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism.

The judge's citation reads: "Jonathan Cook's work on Palestine and Israel, especially his de-coding of official propaganda and his outstanding analysis of events often obfuscated in the mainstream, has made him one of the reliable truth-tellers in the Middle East."

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