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Home arrow Canada and the Middle East arrow Death of a Palestinian minister: How should Canada respond?
Death of a Palestinian minister: How should Canada respond? PDF Print E-mail
Dec 12, 2014 at 12:00 AM

Ziad Abu Ein choked by Israeli police
Palestinian Government Minister Ziad Abu Ein scuffles with Israeli police at a demonstration on December 9th a few moments before his death. The demonstrators were trying to plant trees around an illegal Israeli settlement.
 

Imagine for a moment that the picture above had been taken in Ukraine. That the man being throttled had been an unarmed minister in the Ukrainian government. That he had been in a peaceful demonstration opposing Russian occupation of Ukraine. That he had been beaten and teargassed by Russian troops. That he subsequently died. What would have been the reaction of Foreign Minister John Baird?

Do you think he would have turned away or shrugged his shoulders? Or would he have been incensed and immediately called for justice?

But this is not a hypothetical case. The minister was Palestinian, and he died at the hands of Israeli police. What was Mr. Baird’s response? What should Mr. Baird’s response be?

To read my “open letter” to Hon. John Baird, check out my blog post here:

http://canadatalksisraelpalestine.ca/2014/12/12/death-of-a-minister-open-letter-to-hon-john-baird/

I also sent a copy to opposition leaders. If you agree with me, you might want to write your own letter to Mr. Baird. And copy the other parties as well.

Peter Larson
Chair,
National Education Committee on Israel/Palestine
National Council on Canada-Arab Relations

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Jonathan Cook wins the 2011 Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism

At the 2011 Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism, awarded at a ceremony in London on 2 June 2011, Jonathan Cook was one of three winners. The other two were Umar Cheema, of the International News of Pakistan, and Charles Clover, of the Financial Times. Julian Assange, founder of Wikileaks, won the Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism.

The judge's citation reads: "Jonathan Cook's work on Palestine and Israel, especially his de-coding of official propaganda and his outstanding analysis of events often obfuscated in the mainstream, has made him one of the reliable truth-tellers in the Middle East."

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