header image
Home arrow Resources arrow News arrow In Rachel Corrie verdict, Israel deals new blow to international law
In Rachel Corrie verdict, Israel deals new blow to international law PDF Print E-mail
Aug 28, 2012 at 04:14 PM
The verdict on the 2003 killing of Rachel Corrie absolved Israel of any wrongdoing, essentially blaming the victim for her death. The trial revealed Israel’s approach to the most fundamental principles of international law, and especially to the duty to protect non-combatants.

By Jeff Halper

For those who hoped for a just verdict on the death of Rachel Corrie, the American student and ISM activist killed by an Israeli bulldozer in Gaza in 2003 as she was defending a Palestinian home about to be demolished, this is a sad day. Not surprising, but still sad and bitter. The judge who decided the case, Oded Gershon, absolved the army of all blame, despite massive and internally contradictory testimony to the contrary. Moreover, he essentially blamed Rachel for her own death, commenting that a “normal person” would have run away from the bulldozer rather than confront it.

Palestinians and Israel human rights activists have learned that justice cannot be obtained through the Israeli judicial system. The Haifa District Court, in which the trial was held, could not have ruled other than how the state wanted. For the past 45 years of Israeli occupation, the Supreme Court has excluded from its rulings all reference to international humanitarian law and to the Fourth Geneva Convention in particular, which protects civilians living in conflict situations and under occupation. Only Israeli law applies in the Occupied Palestinian Territories – military law and orders – and the courts have restricted even that form of law by declaring that in instances of “security,” they defer to the military. As in Rachel’s case, the IDF thus has carte blanche to commit war crimes with impunity, with no fear of accountability or punishment.

Read full article...

 

<Previous   Next>
Jonathan Cook wins the 2011 Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism

At the 2011 Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism, awarded at a ceremony in London on 2 June 2011, Jonathan Cook was one of three winners. The other two were Umar Cheema, of the International News of Pakistan, and Charles Clover, of the Financial Times. Julian Assange, founder of Wikileaks, won the Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism.

The judge's citation reads: "Jonathan Cook's work on Palestine and Israel, especially his de-coding of official propaganda and his outstanding analysis of events often obfuscated in the mainstream, has made him one of the reliable truth-tellers in the Middle East."

Read more...