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DePaul Students Turn Graduation Into Protest PDF Print E-mail
Jun 21, 2007 at 01:36 PM
Students Support 2 Professors Denied Tenure

CHICAGO -- DePaul University's recent decision to deny tenure to two professors prompted some students to take a stand in their defense at Sunday's graduation. 

During the ceremony, some students held up signs in favor of the professors, Norman Finkelstein and Mehrene Larudee. Some students also refused to shake DePaul's president the Rev. Dennis Holtschneider's hand and turned their backs to him while he gave the closing remarks. 

by Katherine Schrup, NBC5 Next for full article

DePaul Rejects Finkelstein PDF Print E-mail
Jun 11, 2007 at 07:19 PM
Inside Higher Education       June 11, 2007

DePaul University on Friday formally denied tenure to Norman G. Finkelstein, who has taught political science there while attracting an international following — of both fans and critics — for his attacks on Israeli policies and the “Holocaust industry.”

Finkelstein’s tenure bid has attracted an unusual degree of outside attention and his research has been much debated by scholars of the Middle East. In evaluating his record, DePaul faculty panels and administrators praised him as a teacher and acknowledged that he has become a prominent public intellectual, with works published by major presses. But first a dean and now the president of DePaul — in rejecting tenure for Finkelstein — have cited the style of his work and intellectual combat. Finkelstein was criticized for violating the Vincentian norms of the Roman Catholic university with writing and statements that were deemed hurtful, that contained ad hominem attacks and that did not show respect for others

Given that line of criticism, the Finkelstein case is emerging as a test of whether a range of qualities grouped together as “collegiality” belong in tenure cases. Many colleges and universities consider collegiality — perhaps not surprising given that a positive tenure vote can make someone a colleague for the duration of a career. But many experts on academic freedom, as well as the American Association of University Professors, view skeptically the practice of treating collegiality as a major, independent factor in the tenure process. They fear that collegiality can provide cover for squelching the views of those who may hold controversial or cutting edge views or who just get on their colleagues’ wrong sides.

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Classroom monitor PDF Print E-mail
Apr 04, 2007 at 12:00 AM

Board orders civics teacher at centre of Mideast dust-up out of the class

By GLENN WHEELER
NOW magazine
March 29-April 4, 2007

The Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation has recently launched a grievance at the Toronto District School Board on behalf of teacher and Middle East activist Jason Kunin, NOW has learned.

A civics and English teacher at Vaughan Road Academy, Kunin was asked to leave the classroom for 17 days in January while the board investigated an undisclosed complaint.

Kunin was sent home the very Thursday, January 18, that he and other teachers at a District 12 council meeting sought support for a resolution urging a boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel because of its occupation of Palestinian land. The motion failed.

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Plucky reader honoured for book's defence PDF Print E-mail
Feb 28, 2007 at 12:00 AM

Toronto Star, Feb. 28.
Tess Kalinowski
Education Reporter

A Burlington Grade 5 student has become the first child to receive the Writers' Union of Canada's Freedom to Read Award.

Evie Freedman, 10, is being honoured for her spirited defence last year of the controversial book, Three Wishes: Palestinian and Israeli Children Speak by Simcoe author Deborah Ellis.

The book was pulled out of circulation in some Ontario school libraries, including those in the Toronto and York public boards, after the Canadian Jewish Congress complained it was an inappropriate selection for the Ontario Library Association's Silver Birch reading awards program.

The Halton public board, where Evie attends Charles R. Beaudoin Public School , did not pull the book.

But children like her are among the most affected by book bans, said Ron Brown, chair of the writers' union.

Because of Evie, "we were able to get the message of freedom to read to students of that age," he said.

An ardent fan of Ellis' books, Evie was widely quoted in the press objecting to the censorship of Three Wishes.

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Theatre scraps play on Mideast 'martyr' PDF Print E-mail
Dec 22, 2006 at 12:00 AM

CanStage boss insists artistic merit, not political pressure, behind decision

December 22, 2006
Martin Knelman, arts columnist Toronto Star

Opting to avoid the dangerous liaisons of Middle East politics, the Canadian Stage Company has called off plans to bring the play My Name Is Rachel Corrie to Toronto, the Star has learned.

Martin Bragg, artistic producer of Canstage, said in a phone interview yesterday that he has changed his mind...

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Protesters tell Deltaport to “free Palestine” and block the boat

They say the boat has links to Israeli war crimes

http://www.news1130.com/2014/09/06/protesters-tell-deltaport-to-free-palestine-and-block-the-boat/

DELTA (NEWS1130) Sept. 6 2014 – A group of activists are protesting the expected arrival of an Israeli ship at Deltaport.

The group is promoting the message of “Let Gaza Live and free Palestine.”

The boat is operated by ZIM, which protesters say is connected with the plight of people in Palestine and they think it’s wrong that a company involved in the warfare should profit by using local ports.

John Turnbull is one of the demonstrators and is hopeful the message will be effective. “As worker said, ‘this should be done all around the world.’ Workers at Delta are just as aware of the news as the rest of us are and are just as concerned about it.”

Similar demonstrations have been successful in Oakland, California.

The boat is due to arrive at 11 a.m. tomorrow.