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Israeli Apartheid Structures
Does Israel meet the criteria the UN created to describe apartheid? PDF Print E-mail
Aug 31, 2008 at 12:00 AM

International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid

[This page contains only the Introduction. For the full article, including Procedural History, Documents and Status secions, go here: http://untreaty.un.org/cod/avl/ha/cspca/cspca.html ]

  By John Dugard  
  Professor of International Law  
  Department of Public Law, Faculty of Law, University of Leiden  
________________________________
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The Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid (hereinafter Apartheid Convention) has it roots in the opposition of the United Nations to the discriminatory racial policies of the South African Government – known as apartheid – which lasted from 1948 to 1990. Apartheid was annually condemned by the General Assembly as contrary to Articles 55 and 56 of the Charter of the United Nations from 1952 until 1990; and was regularly condemned by the Security Council after 1960. In 1966, the General Assembly labelled apartheid as a crime against humanity (resolution 2202 A (XXI) of 16 December 1966) and in 1984 the Security Council endorsed this determination (resolution 556 (1984) of 23 October 1984). The Apartheid Convention was the ultimate step in the condemnation of apartheid as it not only declared that apartheid was unlawful because it violated the Charter of the United Nations, but in addition it declared apartheid to be criminal. The Apartheid Convention was adopted by the General Assembly on 30 November 1973, by 91 votes in favour, four against (Portugal, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States) and 26 abstentions. It came into force on 18 July 1976. As of August 2008, it has been ratified by 107 States.

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Israel Penalizing Nakba Commemoration: One More Step Down the Path of Apartheid PDF Print E-mail
Mar 03, 2010 at 12:00 AM

Badil Resource Center [3 March 2010]

The Israeli parliamentary Law Committee has recently approved a law proposal the (“Nakba bill”) that, if passed by the Knesset, would impose economic sanctions on the organizers of Nakba commemorations. Every year in May, Palestinians and supporters of their right of return commemorate the Nakba of 1948, which marks the single most traumatic and far-reaching event in the long and ongoing process of forced displacement and dispossession of the Palestinian people by the state of Israel. Nakba commemorations are important events in Israel, where some 335,000 Palestinians, citizens of Israel, continue to be denied their right to return to their homes, lands and communities, and are forced to live as internally displaced persons within their own country.

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Land and Memory: A SORHA in Palestine PDF Print E-mail
Dec 14, 2009 at 12:00 AM

I went to Palestine on a quest for understanding and knowledge; a sorha is what Arabs call such a spiritual journey. After months of enduring illness, surgery and contemplating my death, I recovered and finished a journey that began many years ago when I became aware of the injustice of the occupation and oppression of an indigenous people across the world as I became involved in Palestinian solidarity work. A journey I had dreamed of undertaking for a long time.

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Dismantling the Matrix of Control PDF Print E-mail
Sep 11, 2009 at 12:00 AM
http://www.merip.org/mero/mero091109.html

Middle East Report                                                                                         

September 11, 2009

At this critical juncture, as the two-state solution for the Israeli-Palestinian impasse disappears under the weight of Israeli settlements, there is a great imponderable: Is President Barack Obama genuinely serious about reaching such a solution or is he merely going through the motions familiar from previous administrations? 

Jeff Halper

Jeff Halper’s original article on the “matrix of control” appeared in Middle East Report 216 (Fall 2000).

 

For additional background, see Gary Sussman, “The Challenge to the Two-State Solution,” Middle East Report 231 (Summer 2004).

Almost a decade ago I wrote an article describing Israel’s “matrix of control” over the Occupied Palestinian Territories. It consisted then of three interlocking systems: military administration of much of the West Bank and incessant army and air force intrusions elsewhere; a skein of “facts on the ground,” notably settlements in the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem, but also bypass roads connecting the settlements to Israel proper; and administrative measures like house demolitions and deportations. I argued in 2000 that unless this matrix was dismantled, the occupation would not be ended and a two-state solution could not be achieved. 

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Citizenship law makes Israel an apartheid state PDF Print E-mail
Jun 29, 2008 at 12:00 AM
Ha’aretz 29/06/2008
By Amos Schocken

The government’s decision last week to extend the validity of the Citizenship Law (Temporary Order), for another year, is evidence that the legal barriers preventing severe discrimination against Israel’s Arab citizens and harm to their civil rights have been removed.
 
This extension is the eighth since the law was first passed in 2003, and it shows just how naive Justice Edmond Levy&rsquos position was when he refused to join in the 2006 decision by five judges from the High Court of Justice, who stated that the law was unconstitutional, that it contravened the Basic Law on Human Dignity and Freedom, and that it must be removed from the law books. Levy explained his refusal by saying that he saw no need to intervene because only two months remained until the law expired. However, at the end of the two months, the law was extended by a year, and now they want to extend it for yet another year.

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About that Word Apartheid PDF Print E-mail
May 31, 2007 at 12:00 AM

The Link Archives 

Title: About That Word Apartheid
Author: Mahoney, John; Adas, Jane; Norberg, Robert

April - May  2007
Volume 40, Issue 2

President Carter’s latest book, “Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid,” has unleashed–-to use a much over-used phrase--a firestorm of controversy.

To suggest that white, racist South Africa’s treatment of its indigenous inhabitants is in any way similar to Israel’s treatment of its indigenous inhabitants, for some, smacks of anti-Semitism.

And yet, a Google search of “Israel + Apartheid” brings up 5.5 million references. The subject, it seems, is being discussed.

So, to help clarify the relationship between Israel and apartheid South Africa, we have put together a timeline, beginning with June 1917, when Dr. Chaim Weizmann and Gen. Jan Christian Smuts met in London to lobby for their respective causes. Researchers for our article include AMEU directors Jane Adas and Bob Norberg, and myself. A longer version with source references is available on our website: www.ameu.org.—John F. Mahoney, Executive Director, April, 2007.

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Barenboim criticizes Israel after musician blocked from Gaza PDF Print E-mail
Dec 17, 2007 at 12:00 AM
The Canadian Press
December 17th, 2007

BERLIN - Conductor Daniel Barenboim criticized Israel Monday for preventing a Palestinian musician in an ensemble that was to perform at a music festival from entering the Gaza Strip for a concert.  

Barenboim said his group of about 20 musicians from England, the United States, France and Germany, as well the Palestinian musician, had been authorized by Israeli authorities to travel to Gaza for a baroque music festival, where they were to play on Sunday.  

But the 27-year-old was stopped at the Israel-Gaza border and informed he needed individual permission to enter. The group was held for seven hours at the border, then cancelled its concert in solidarity.  
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Israel asks Supreme Court to delay evacuation of West Bank settlement

The Associated Press - Sunday, June 22, 2012

JERUSALEM — Israel's government on Sunday asked the country's Supreme Court to delay the evacuation of an unauthorized West Bank settlement outpost by a month, its latest attempt to put off a potential clash with extremist settlers. No court decision was announced.

The Migron outpost, about 15 kilometres north of Jerusalem, was built on privately owned Palestinian land, a practice the court outlawed decades ago. Some Migron settlers have petitioned the court to remain in their homes. About a third of them claim they've recently bought the land where their houses stand from Palestinians.

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